An itinerant life resumes – Heading up North (Kodiak, Alaska)

Photo by Sikumi

Photo by Sikumi

I bid you all adieu. A brief adieu as I will be heading up to Alaska this Monday, in search of revelation, release and restoration. Oh, and some mutha truckin money! Haha

But really, I am eagerly awaiting a plentiful season, few humpies and lots of reds. God willing the return will be nice as well.

If anyone needs to get a hold of me, I can be reached at this address:

C/o Virginia Adams
Attn: Ade` Craig
Box 8905
Kodiak, AK 99615
My cell phone will be off and so email or my mothers phone @ 6027624206 would be a great way to connect.
Happy days to everyone. Be well and live life to serve others. Until next time.
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The brevity and significance of all our lives

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“It’s no secret to those knowledgeable about addiction and recovery that people are most vulnerable to relapse when they are closest to achieving sobriety.” – Rita Lowenthal

One – Way Ticket is one of those books you don’t dare pass on. Simply because it’s too precious. It’s a book that reminds us amongst other things, that no matter how much pain or grief we cause to our mothers in particular, we will never lose sight in her eyes.

Rita Lowenthal, presumably in her 80’s at the time of this post, was and still is the mother of Josh Lowenthal, a talented Jewish musician and artist whose inability to conquer his addiction, allowed a disease to infiltrate and ultimately take his life. Ms. Lowenthal chooses words that invite you into her sons former world, causing the reader to feel as if they knew Josh intimately. Meet and greets with famous jazz legends, relationships with loving women who chose not to run during Josh’s bouts in county jail and then worse, his numerous bids in the oldest prison in California, San Quentin.

Like the serenity prayer, Rita so gracefully portrays through words, detailing her arduous fight to save her son’s life, that sometime we have to accept the things in which are beyond our control.

Although my struggles aren’t with drugs, I have many.

I search for books in a very fortuitous manner. In the search bar I type in the genre and vaguely sift through the titles that seem interesting. If available I’ll read the brief summary attached. However, I am beginning to believe that the way in which these books find their rightful place on my desk is less fortuitous and more good fortune. At times they cause deep bouts of depression, but praise God, I am always stronger for having read them.

 

RIP –  JOSH LOWENTHAL

 

 

A classic tale of survival and coming out renewed on the other side.

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There comes a moment when one faces the fresh features of an inner face; a time of conscious rebirth, when the accounting’s done, the weave in its final flourish, a time when a man stands before the world – vulnerable, nothing owed – and considers his place in it. I had reached such a moment.

Luis J. Rodriguez

Always Running’ is a book, better yet, a ‘piece’ that makes a person pause and search inside oneself. A book that points our gaze out through a window, towards the still morning sky, recollecting on and digesting sentences so artfully and delicately constructed. Words portraying lives many of us hope to avoid, carefully chosen words many writers hope to master.

A designer and writer are essentially one in the same. A designer creates pleasure visually whereas a writer uses words to create pleasurable imagery. Rodriguez is a writer whose paragraphs are devoid of either fat or wasted space, a writer whose experiences breathed life into every situation. At times I felt as if I were the protagonist, figuring out how to survive my adolescence.

I think I’ll write Mr. Rodriguez a letter. In it I will thank him for escaping death, for had it been inescapable, it’s a fair argument that countless souls would still be running.